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PARLIAMENT OF AUSTRALIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Speech CONDOLENCES Fraser, Rt Hon. John Malcolm, AC CH Wednesday, 25 March 2015 Clive Palmer – Member for Fairfax Mr PALMER (Fairfax) (16:46): Before the last election Malcolm Fraser and I had lunch in Melbourne. When I met him on that cold Melbourne morning he was in high spirits and eager to engage in debate about important issues affecting Australia’s future. High on his mind on that cold Melbourne morning and over lunch was the threat to the world and Australia of war. He stated that the world had been at war for over 50 years in different parts of the globe and he wondered when it would all end, when it would all stop. He was a strong supporter of development and sustainable growth and said as Prime Minister: Development requires modification and transformation of the environment … The planet’s capacity to support its people is being irreversibly reduced by the destruction and degradation of the biosphere and the need to understand the problem and take corrective action is becoming urgent. He saw the dangers to our planet far before others had and thought about the issue. In his travels around Australia as Prime Minister he touched the people and they touched him. He valued our democracy and reminded us in 1980 as Prime Minister that secrecy is completely inadequate for a democracy but totally appropriate for tyranny. As Malcolm Fraser once said when referring to Nelson Mandela: If there were six Mandelas around today, a couple in Europe, one in America and in a couple of other places, there wouldn’t be any wars. The truth is that, if today there were six Malcolm Frasers around—a couple in Europe, one in America and a couple in other places, there would not be any wars. Like many world leaders, he helped Nelson Mandela on his long walk to freedom. He supported the South African people in their struggle for human rights and self- determination. No greater accolade, no greater title or acknowledgement can be given to any man than that of peacemaker. Malcolm Fraser believed in the reconciliation of man. He sought refuge for the stateless. He saw injustice and he tried to stop it. He saw division in this country and he tried to heal it. He devoted his life to those less fortunate than himself. Gifted and intelligent, he perceived and saw what others could not see. He saw an Australia where all Australian children could join hands and take a long walk together into the future. He saw an Australia where all cultures of the world could be united in one country, valuing their heritage and embracing each other in one nation. His words in 1981 during his inaugural address to the Institute of Multicultural Affairs are equally true today. He said: … multiculturalism speaks to us forcefully and directly … It is not an abstract or alien notion, not a blueprint holding out utopian promises, but a set of guidelines for action which grows directly out of our society’s aspirations and experiences. While understated and modest in his manner, he was strong on courage and commitment. One of the rarest commodities in political life is courage—political courage, the ability to do what is right regardless of the cost, regardless of admonishment by your peers, to go forward where others would not go. He showed us the way, and we must follow his example and cherish the gifts that he has left for us as citizens of this great country. I remember back in the early 1980s when no state in the Commonwealth was interested in hosting Expo. It was 102 The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia


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