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you. They're the things that really resonate and will resonate in 100 years’ time. When we look back in life and we look back in history all of us have the opportunity to have ideas and to make a contribution. Many years ago the Queensland government decided they were going to abolish death duties because they thought it was unfair that children should pay in a time of grief and they abolished death duties in Queensland. As a result of that the treasury boffins at the time said ‘we’ll have no revenue, we won’t be able to pay everyone; the state will decline’. And the result was 30,000 people came to Queensland ever month. The economy boomed, the Gold Coast boomed. This university is a result, I think, of that decision. So sometimes we have to be bold and brave and provide the leadership on where the state should go. Queensland became Australia’s number one state, instead of where we are at the current time. While I'm here I should say that Wayne Swan has been very critical of me – I think you know who he is – for opposing mining taxes. I just want to say that Wayne’s a great supporter of Bruce Springsteen and a few of you may know Bruce Springsteen’s records. Well, I met Bruce Springsteen when I was in New York recently and you’ll all be happy to know that he lives in a $40million apartment in Manhattan, he wears Versace jeans, as about $600million in assets and he writes great songs about poor people living across the river in New Jersey! What a guy! Isn't it great to know our treasurer got so much inspiration from all of that! What a wonderful man. I said at the time, when they interviewed me and asked what I thought of Bruce Springsteen, that it was good for Wayne (Swan) because he was born to run! Anyway, I said I like Redgum. Redgum is a little bit of a left group and I’m a bit of a right demagogue, so you wouldn’t think I’d like Redgum, but I thought they were good. My favourite Redgum song is One More Boring Night in Adelaide. I don’t know whether you’ve heard that one with Ernie Sigley and all that. Anyway, when I made that statement about Redgum they sent me all their records. I got this great big pack of records, CDs, everything, autographs, the whole lot – it was really fantastic. Anyway, that’s another story for another day. I had a lot of criticism from Wayne Swan because I opposed the mining tax. And I know that by introducing new taxes we can destroy the economy and the opportunities for all of us because we’re all in competition. We want to attract as much investment to Australia as we possibly can. It rings true that by increasing our royalties so that now we have the highest rate of royalties in the mining industries, it’s very, very difficult. Unless we can increase government revenue; unless the government can make more money, it’s not very good for our hospitals, for our schools or the things you really rely on. I don’t know if any of you have had an operation, but when you're sitting there in hospital you want to know the doctor’s got a good education. Anyway, I remember Wayne attacking me with Kevin Rudd - do you remember Kevin Rudd? – when they tried to introduce the original mining tax. As the prime minister at the time, he was invited to the Media Club in Brisbane to comment on the mining tax. He went there and he just made jokes about someone being very fat. He said, “Clive makes fat profits; he’s a fat guy”, all this sort of stuff. Sitting in the front row were a lot of fat unionists and they didn’t find it very funny. So the next day the financial review had up there that ‘Clive gets the last laugh on the mining tax’, this was on the Saturday. So I went down to Sydney, I was in Wagga Wagga, and I was talking to the media. I had a little earpiece in my ear and the prime minister was on the other end of the phone. He started again, saying “Clive’s too fat; he makes too much money” and he really had a go about fat people in general (I know we’re talking about human rights but I’ll talk about fat people). And I thought, “Gee, what will I do? How am I going to respond to this one?” So they said, “What have you got to say Professor Palmer?” I stopped and I pondered and thought and said, “I’m calling on fat of throughout Australia - wherever they may be – in the unions, public service, parliament, fat families across the nation, to rise up in one almighty torrent and throw the prime minister out of office. Fat really rocks!” 204 The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia


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