Page 227

THe Last Sentry at the Gate 1

Anyway, I went off to China on Wednesday and come back on Friday and they’d done it! So, I like to think about today as not being a gift from my parents, but that we’re borrowing it from our children. And in this difficult moment when much has been written in the media about me and what may happen in the future, I just want to say to all of you – because I am a bit of a political person – that I’m proud to be a life member of the LNP (Liberal National Party), I’m proud to be a member of its state constitution, I’m proud to have founded it and I’m proud of the policies that we’ve got in the LNP, which I think are the best policies for Queensland. The problem is they haven’t been implemented. The problem is that politicians and people can vote for things and they don’t always happen. That’s when the community and people like yourselves have to call them to account. You know, I’ve got a strong commitment to Australia. In the First World War my uncle was killed in Europe and other members of my family served in Gallipoli. Five of us served in New Guinea and my uncle was in the 39th Battalion on the Kokoda Trail. Three of my nephews are still suffering effects from the Vietnam War. Whether it was a good or bad war their lives have been destroyed by it. My other nephew, Group Captain Martin Brewster, was in charge of logistics in East Timor and I think he did a wonderful job. All of those people have done a lot more than I could ever do for this country. When you think about it you have to think about what we need in Australia. Today, in this country, we need a spirit of service. A spirit of giving; a spirit of compassion. A spirit of concern for all the people who face hardship, be it families in this state at the moment, refugees. I just want them to know that they're not alone. More than anything else we need a spirit; a spirit of service. And as you go forth into the world you’ve got that great opportunity to have that spirit of service and you can project the values and the things that you believe, the experiences that you’ve had and you can show compassion. We can’t always be right. I’m wrong more than I'm right, but we can at least care about the people we live with. So, as President Kennedy said in his inaugural speech in Washington in 1961, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” Thanks very much. QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR QUESTION: You said that you thought the key to our future was science, technology and education. What would you think about a university that was removing all of its technical program? CLIVE PALMER: Well I think it’s a reaction from politicians who don’t really understand what the future brings and don’t look at the global economy. Australia is really not affected as much by the global downturn as other places; it’s a matter of perception. If you look at the figures of raw materials going to China and going to other Asian countries - the actual shipments - the shipments aren’t down, the demand’s not down. As I said, 350 million are moving from country to poverty. It’s the perception of what’s happening in Greece and what’s happening in the United States which is affecting us here. Our politicians are reacting by cutting budgets for education. If I was prime minister I think I would double the education budget. If you go to MIT or some of the major campuses in the States you'll find that they're there working on product development, technology development at one time. But of course in this country we have a lot of barriers to stop that The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia 205


THe Last Sentry at the Gate 1
To see the actual publication please follow the link above