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SPEECH Inaugural National Press Club Address 12 November 2013 In his first address to the National Press Club as an elected MP, Clive Palmer discusses the role of the media in reporting the critical issues. COMPERE: Ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon and welcome to the National Press Club and today’s National Australia Bank address. The Press Club is delighted to welcome back after just a couple of months, Clive Palmer, head of the Palmer United Party. Clive was here in a pretty robust, pretty illuminating and pretty entertaining debate with Bob Katter who, of course, won his seat of Kennedy at the election. Of course, Clive Palmer, after several recounts, won the seat of Fairfax, the seat based on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland by a very modest 53 votes. Of course, at the election we also saw the success of the Palmer United Party with the election of two, possibly three senators, depending on the recount in Western Australia and, of course, the formation in very recent times of an alliance with some other cross-bench senators. So, I think it’s fair to say from 1 July 2014, the Palmer United Party is going to be a force in the 44th Parliament. Please welcome, Clive Palmer. Applause CLIVE PALMER: Thanks very much. Defenders of freedom I'd call journalists because that's what they really are, and we meet today at a time which is a critical time for the nation to set the national agenda. Never before have the rights of our citizens been more important. Never before has our press had a more important role to play, to report the critical issues of our time and to stimulate our nation at a time following an election which was devoid of ideas from national leaders that should know better, and should offer an agenda for the country for the future. It's never been more important for our country for the press to stimulate the enterprise of the nation. Governments may rise and fall, but ideas go on forever. Newspapers, internet, radio and all the media form a link that turns ideas into policy, policy into legislation; legislation and laws that can provide benefits for all our citizens. Media men and women have through history been at the forefront of change, the forefront of those ideas. They've been at the forefront of keeping government and business and other people accountable, having scrutiny on what they do and protecting the diversity of the nation. But they've also been at the forefront of change. Nothing is more certain than there'll be change. Success reflects that change in our economy and, indeed, in our political agenda. In 1851, a long time ago, the New York Herald Tribune had retained its London correspondent, a little-known journalist named by his mother as Karl Marx. Apparently he was without means, his family was sick and hungry and, not having any money, he repeatedly appealed to his publisher, Horace Greely, and his editor, Charles Dana, to boost his salary of $5 a story, a stipend his close friend Engels said was the lousiest petty bourgeoisie cheating that he's ever seen. Nevertheless, all of Marx's pleas for an increase of salaries to his editor fell on deaf ears. Do you know the feeling? So what did Marx do? He sought another means to support his family, to find the recognition that all journalists deserve. So he was forced to give up his job at the New York Herald Tribune, so he'd spend all his time working on an idea, an idea he thought he would leave to the world, the ideas which became the foundation of Stalinism, Leninism, revolution and the Cold War. If only this bourgeoisie capitalist publisher and editor had treated him more fairly and listened to his increase for wages. If only Marx had remained a foreign correspondent, the world might be a different place and the 20th century wouldn't have so much suffering. I just want to say today that I hope Rupert Murdoch and all publishers 220 The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia


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