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States will have to get a smaller share, I'm sure Jacqui Lambie would, in particular, be against that notion. What's your idea? And just further on David's question, what sort of barriers will you put between your parliamentary business and your private work? Are we going to see divestments? CLIVE PALMER: No. ANDREW PROBYN: Are we going to see someone else running the businesses on your behalf? CLIVE PALMER: Well, I haven't run most of my businesses recently. I mean, that's the reality of it. We've got an executive team that runs our businesses; I'm just an investor, really. I might be on the team, but I'm not certainly in charge of all that, no more than Rupert Murdoch runs the Australian. I mean, he sits up there in New York, you don't ask Rupert, you know, when is he going to divest in the Australian, no doubt he'll close it if it keeps on declining in sales the way it has. Laughter But, you know, that's for Rupert. But anyway, we know that News Limited is a wonderful employer that never sacks people, never bullies people, and complies with the Work and Safety, workplace relations Act. We know that News Limited would never do those sorts of things that you're suggesting we do. But, of course, it's not about me, you don't seem to get the message, it's about Australians and what they should do. And as the constitution envisages, quite clearly, that members from all walks of life will serve in Parliament, and bring to the Parliament their experience in life, and they'll come to the right solutions for Australia. It doesn't envisage a two-party system where people are terrified to say anything, because they'll lose their endorsements. It supports an active and healthy press that can support a change of ideas. Now, we sat here two months ago, and we heard the fact that we weren't going to win any seats in Parliament, that we weren't going to do any good, but you were wrong, you know. On Western Australia, on the GST, the proposition's got to be that if you're producing more, you're achieving more, you should receive more. We can't have a situation where there's no incentive for people to do anything. So this is a philosophical view I've got, we've got to provide the incentive and in doing so, producing more of the cake, we have more we can share around Australia. It should be possible to maintain the level of wealth we're getting from WA for the other States, but increase what WA gets if we increase the whole amount of our output, that's what our policies are. ANDREW PROBYN: Can I just jump in there, are you suggesting special purpose payments, competition payments that sort of thing? Because the way that the Commonwealth Grants Commission operates - that wouldn't be allowed, what you're suggesting. CLIVE PALMER: Look, I don't care how they operate, I'm telling you what the answer is, mate, you know. I'm suggesting we grow our economy and get the place moving, we don't sit on our hands and be constricted with what we've done in the past. If you want to go in the past go back and live in the past. We've got to project for the future. COMPERE: We do, next question is from James Massola. JAMES MASSOLA: Mr Palmer, James Massola from the Financial Review. CLIVE PALMER: Hi James. JAMES MASSOLA: Hi, how are you. Look, a - couple of your senators are here today, another one would-be Senator Wang, also Ricky Muir and Wayne Dropulich. Now, we understand obviously you're in alliance with Mr Muir, potentially with Mr Dropulich, we've actually heard very little detail about what the terms of those alliances are actually going to be. I was wondering if you could actually shed some light on that? And as a follow-up question, wondering if you have approached anyone else on the cross-benches, Senator Madigan, Cathy McGowan, Bob Katter, to try and increase your representation in the Parliament? 226 The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia


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