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Laughter Laughs Then they had to get the Australian Federal Police to come in and make the conclusion that it was gone. But they didn't know where it went and they didn't know who took it. But it's gone. Having been there and now having been gone, means that somebody took it I would suggest. And they did that because we were about to be awarded the third senator in Western Australia and the balance of power in this country and someone didn't like it; they didn't know we were talking to the motorists in Victoria God bless them. Or who knows why they did it? If you look at the five booths that are gone and you look at the results for those five booths and you add them to the partial recount, Palmer United wins another senator in Western Australia. You know, it's too convenient to know that those votes were gone and to not think that something sinister hasn't been involved. In my booth, we saw a grave difference between the pre-poll booths and what was being experienced on Election Day when we had scrutineers counting the votes straight after the election. For example, at the Coolum Beach polling booth, even though there were 750 votes in there that weren't for me, I got 51.9 per cent of the vote in the pre-poll. At Coolum Beach on the voting day, I got 61.06 per cent of the vote. At Maroochydore polling booth, I got 44.18 per cent of the pre-poll, but on Election Day I got 58.61 per cent of the vote. These are areas which are all the same. These are areas with the same demographic of people. It doesn't make sense that the pre-poll vote should vary by up to 20 per cent. And it does raise a question, why did that happen? The Nambour polling booth, for example, I got 52 per cent of the vote in pre-polling; I got 64 per cent of the vote on the Election Day. And you can go right through the electorate and see how there's a great variance. None of them in my favour. All pre-polling votes should be counted and scrutinised on the day that the votes are cast. Otherwise the integrity of the pre-poll needs to be questioned, as does their security. In Indi they found a thousand votes to elect Kathy to the Australian Parliament. This shows the lack of security. The votes should never have been lost in the first place in Western Australia, as you know, the AEC lost or stole five ballot boxes. Disappearing again with two metre-long ballot papers, 1370 of them. Or did Uri Geller do it? Or was someone actually hiding behind the curtain? Or did someone come back at night with a key and remove them? We'll never know. And, was it because, as I said, the election of Dio Wang as a senator for us would've made a difference to the balance of power in the country? The AEC security, or lack of it, as well as the organisation, has been exposed in the Keelty report and the handling of the Western Australian election. Why hasn't the electorate commissioner or the Deputy Commissioner of the AEC accepted responsibility and resigned, as any minister would? No care and no responsibility. Once Australian ballots were locked up under lock and key, with two people holding the keys, and two different locks in a sturdy metal box. Today they're kept in a cardboard box with a rubber band around them. They could be tampered with very easily. And in the case of pre-polls and postal votes, no ID is required and they're not counted until after the result of the election on the day is known and the rest of the election is known to the people who were allegedly counting the pre-poll votes or tallying them up. They should be counted and scrutinised first when they're received, not later when they can be changed or eliminated this would eliminate the pocket where they could be altered or adjusted once the result of the election was known. The eligibility for postal votes should be restricted to those with a genuine need to make them. They should not be seen as a convenience and the AEC is now proposing that the postal votes should be expanded so people can vote again without ID and these mysterious votes can arrive in the mail, and no-one knows what they are, and they're not seen by scrutineers' eyes or by anyone until after the poll, under the current system. 238 The Last Sentry at the Gate: Clive Palmer & the 44th Parliament of Australia


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